FAQ

Can anybody have implants?

Anyone who is over 18 and is in reasonably good health can have implants. An individual assessment is necessary to decide whether dental implants are a viable solution for you.

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Will dental implants work for me?

Anyone who is missing one or more teeth due to decay or injury may be a candidate for dental implants. The main limitation is the amount of bone available. We can evaluate whether dental implants are a viable solution for you.

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What does it cost?

Your desire to possess beautiful, fully-functioning teeth is an investment that will pay dividends in terms of your confidence and your capacity to chew and eat with ease. Our approach is to undertake a comprehensive consultation that provides you with a range of treatment and cost options allowing you to make an informed decision. Call us to find out more about the initial consultation.

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Do they last forever?

Dental implants have been in use since the 1960s. They are the most effective and longest lasting solution available.

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Will it hurt?

Implants must be placed very gently so soreness afterwards is very slight. People are often surprised how little discomfort there is but sedation is available for those who prefer.

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Does it take long?

It will take appointments spread over several months to restore your smile with dental implants. We can hide gaps with temporary dentures or bridges while the treatment is in progress.

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What is Zoom! tooth whitening?

Zoom! is a bleaching process that lightens discoloration of enamel and dentin. You may have seen the Zoom! process used by me on ABC’s Extreme Makeover.

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How long does Zoom! Chairside Whitening take?

The complete procedure takes less than an hour. The procedure begins with a preparation period followed as little as by 45 minutes of bleaching. (A cleaning is recommended prior to the actual Zoom! whitening session.)

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How does the Zoom! In-off ice system work?

The Zoom! light activated whitening gel's active ingredient is Hydrogen Peroxide. As the Hydrogen Peroxide is broken down, oxygen enters the enamel and dentin, bleaching colored substances while the structure of the tooth is unchanged. The Zoom! light aids in activating the hydrogen peroxide and helps it penetrate the surface of the tooth. A study has shown that use of the Zoom! lamp increases the effectiveness of the Zoom! gel by 26% or more, giving an average improvement of up to eight shades.

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What will I experience during the Zoom! In-Office Procedure?

During the procedure, patients may comfortably watch television or listen to music. Individuals with a strong gag reflex or anxiety may have difficulty undergoing the entire procedure.

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How long do the results last?

By following some simple post whitening care instructions, your teeth will always be lighter than they were before. To keep your teeth looking their best, we recommend flossing, brushing twice daily, and occasional touch-ups with Zoom! Weekender or Nite White gel. These are professional formula products designed specifically to keep your teeth their brightest. They are available only through your dental professional.

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Are there any side effects?

Sensitivity during the treatment may occur with some patients. The Zoom! light generates minimal heat which is the usual source of discomfort. On rare occasions, minor tingling sensations are experienced immediately after the procedure, but always dissipate. You can also ask your dentist to supply you with anti-sensitivity toothpaste for use prior to treatment.

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What causes tooth discoloration?

There are many causes. The most common include aging and consumption of staining substances such as coffee, tea, colas, tobacco, red wine, etc. During tooth formation, consumption of tetracycline, certain antibiotics or excessive fluoride may also cause tooth discoloration.

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Do many people whiten their teeth?

More people than you might imagine. A bright sparkling smile can make a big difference for everyone. The Zoom! Chairside Whitening System makes it easier and faster than ever before.

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Who may benefit from tooth whitening?

Almost anyone. However, treatment may not be as effective for some as it is for others. Your dental professional can determine if you are a viable candidate for this procedure through a thorough oral exam, including a shade assessment.

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Is whitening safe?

Yes. Extensive research and clinical studies indicate that whitening teeth under the supervision of a dentist is safe. In fact, many dentists consider whitening the safest cosmetic dental procedure available. As with any tooth whitening product, Zoom! is not recommended for children under 13 years of age and pregnant or lactating women

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What is root canal treatment?

Your dentist uses root canal treatment to find the cause and then treat problems of the tooth's soft core (the dental pulp). Years ago, teeth with diseased or injured pulps were removed. Today, root canal treatment has given dentists a safe way of saving teeth.

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What is the dental pulp?

The pulp is the soft tissue that contains nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue. It lies within the tooth and extends from the crown of the tooth to the tip of the root in the bone of the jaws.

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What happens if the pulp gets injured?

An abscessed (infected) tooth caused by tooth decay. When the pulp is diseased or injured and can't repair itself, it dies. The most common cause of pulp death is a cracked tooth or a deep cavity. Both of these problems can let germs (bacteria) enter the pulp. Germs can cause an infection inside the tooth. Left without treatment, pus builds up at the root tip, in the jawbone, forming a "pus-pocket" called an abscess. An abscess can cause damage to the bone around the teeth.

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Why does the pulp need to be removed?

When the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result. Certain byproducts of the infection can injure your jaw bones. Without treatment, your tooth may have to be removed.

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What Does treatment involve?

Treatment often involves from one to three visits. During treatment, your general dentist or endodontist (a dentist who specializes in problems of the pulp) removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed. Here's how your tooth is saved through treatment:
1-First, an opening is made through the crown of the tooth.
2-An opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber.
3-The pulp is then removed. The root canal(s) is cleaned and shaped to a form that can be filled.
4-The pulp is removed, and the root canals are cleaned, enlarged and shaped.
5-Medications may be put in the pulp chamber and root canal(s) to help get rid of germs and prevent infection.
6-A temporary filling will be placed in the crown opening to protect the tooth between dental visits. Your dentist may leave the tooth open for a few days to drain. You might also be given medicine to help control infection that may have spread beyond the tooth.
7-The pulp chamber and root canals are filled and sealed.
8-The temporary filling is removed and the pulp chamber and root canal(s) are cleaned and filled.
9-In the final step, a gold or porcelain crown is usually placed over the tooth. If an endodontist performs the treatment, he or she will recommend that you return to your family dentist for this final step.
10-The crown of the tooth is then restored.

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How long will the restored tooth last?

Your restored tooth could last a lifetime, if you continue to care for your teeth and gums. However, regular checkups are necessary. As long as the root(s) of a treated tooth are nourished by the tissues around it, your tooth will remain healthy.

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What are braces made from?

Braces (also called orthodontic appliances) can be as inconspicuous—or as noticeable—as you like. Brackets—the part of the braces that attach to each tooth—are smaller and can sometimes be attached to the back of the tooth, making the brackets less noticeable. Brackets may be made of metal, ceramic, plastic or a combination of these materials. Some brackets are clear or tooth-colored. There are brackets shaped like hearts and footballs, and elastics (orthodontic rubber bands) in school colors or holiday hues such as red, white and blue. And there are gold-plated braces and glow-in-the-dark retainers.

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Are they left in the mouth or can they be removed?

There are two types of orthodontic appliances: fixed, which are worn all the time and can only be removed by the dentist, and removable, which the patient can take out of the mouth. The dentist selects the type based on your needs.

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When should treatment begin?

Malocclusions often become noticeable between the ages of 6 and 12, as the child’s permanent (adult) teeth erupt. Orthodontic treatment often begins between ages 8 and 14. Treatment that begins while a child is growing helps produce optimal results. As a result, children should have an orthodontic evaluation no later than age 7. By then, they have a mix of primary (baby) teeth and their permanent (adult) teeth. Your child’s dentist can spot problems with emerging teeth and jaw growth early on, while the primary teeth are present. That’s why regular dental examinations are important.

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How about adults wearing braces?

Children aren’t the only ones who can benefit from orthodontics. If you’re an adult, it’s not too late to correct problems such as crooked or crowded teeth, overbites, underbites, incorrect jaw position, or jaw-joint disorders. The biological process involved in moving teeth is the same at any age. Usually, adult treatment takes a little longer than a child's treatment. Because an adult's facial bones are no longer growing, certain corrections may not be accomplished with braces alone. No matter your age, it's never too late to improve your dental health and beautify your smile.

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Who provides orthodontic treatment?

Most dentists are trained to treat some minor orthodontic problems. If the dentist thinks the patient should see a specialist for treatment, he or she will provide a referral to an orthodontist. Orthodontics is a specialty area of dentistry that is officially known as Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics. The purpose of orthodontics is to treat malocclusion through braces, corrective procedures and other “ appliances ” to straighten teeth and correct jaw alignment. An orthodontist is a dentist who specializes in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of dental and facial irregularities Although treatment plans are customized for each patient, most wear their braces from one to three years, depending on what conditions need correcting. This is followed by a period of wearing a “ retainer ” that holds teeth in their new positions. Although a little discomfort is expected during treatment, today's braces are more comfortable than ever before. Newer materials apply a constant, gentle force to move teeth and usually require fewer adjustments. Good oral hygiene is especially important when braces are present. Brushing regularly, as directed by the dentist, flossing daily and scheduling dental visits can help keep teeth healthy. Patients with braces should maintain a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks. Your dentist may recommend avoiding certain foods that could interfere with braces or accidentally bend the wires. These foods may include nuts, popcorn, hard candy, ice and sticky foods like chewing gum, caramel or other chewy candy.

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Can I play sports with while wearing braces?

A protective mouth guard is recommended for sports and other activities that may result in injury to the mouth or jaw. Your dentist can suggest an appropriate mouth guard when the braces are in place. Braces typically do not interfere with playing wind or brass instruments although more practice may be needed to adapt.

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How should I clean my baby's teeth?

A toothbrush with soft bristles and a small head, especially one designed for infants, is the best choice for infants. Brushing at least twice a day, especially at bedtime, will remove plaque bacteria that can lead to decay. A smear-amount of fluoridated toothpaste should be used twice a day.

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At what age should my child have his/her first dental visit?

"First visit by first birthday" is the general rule. To prevent dental problems, your child should see a pediatric dentist within 6 months after the first tooth appears.

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When do the first teeth start to erupt?

At about 6 months, the two lower front teeth (central incisors) will erupt, followed shortly by the two upper central incisors. The remainder of the baby teeth appear during the next 18 to 24 months but not necessarily in an orderly sequence from front to back. At 2 to 3 years, all of these 20 primary teeth should be present.

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Why should my child see a pediatric dentist?

Baby bottle tooth decay is a pattern of rapid decay associated with prolonged nursing. It happens when a child goes to sleep while breast-feeding and/or bottle-feeding. During sleep, the flow of saliva is reduced and the natural self-cleansing action of the mouth is diminished. Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bedtime bottle. Encourage your child to drink from a cup as they approach their first birthday. He/she should be weaned from the bottle at 12-14 months of age. Frequent drinking of milk or juice in a non-spill cup may also cause cavities on the back teeth.Pediatric dentistry is a dental specialty that focuses on the oral health of children and adolescents, and particularly those with special healthcare needs. Following dental school, a pediatric dentist has two to three years additional specialty training in the unique needs of infants, children and adolescents, including those with special health care needs.

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Can thumb sucking be harmful for my child's teeth?

Baby bottle tooth decay is a pattern of rapid decay associated with prolonged nursing. It happens when a child goes to sleep while breast-feeding and/or bottle-feeding. During sleep, the flow of saliva is reduced and the natural self-cleansing action of the mouth is diminished. Avoid nursing children to sleep or putting anything other than water in their bedtime bottle. Encourage your child to drink from a cup as they approach their first birthday. He/she should be weaned from the bottle at 12-14 months of age. Frequent drinking of milk or juice in a non-spill cup may also cause cavities on the back teeth.


Pediatric dentistry is a dental specialty that focuses on the oral health of children and adolescents, and particularly those with special healthcare needs. Following dental school, a pediatric dentist has two to three years additional specialty training in the unique needs of infants, children and adolescents, including those with special health care needs.

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What are dental sealants and how do they work?

Sealants are clear or shaded materials similar to white fillings applied to the teeth to help keep them cavity-free. Sealants fill in the grooved and pitted surfaces of the teeth, which are hard to clean, and shut out food particles that could get caught and cause cavities. Fast and comfortable to apply, sealants may effectively protect the grooved surfaces of the teeth for many years. It should be noted that sealants do not cover the entire surface of the teeth.

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If my child gets a toothache, what should I do?

To comfort your child, rinse his/her mouth with warm salt water and apply a cold compress or ice wrapped in a cloth on your child's face if it is swollen. Do not put heat or aspirin on the sore area, but you may give the child ibuprophen or acetaminophen for pain. See your pediatric dentist as soon as possible.

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Is my child getting enough fluoride?

Fluoride has been shown to dramatically decrease a person's chances of getting cavities by making teeth stronger and slowing the bacterial growth in the mouth. The best way fluoride works is in its topical form when it comes into contact with the tooth surface. To determine if your child is a candidate for getting fluoride supplements consult your pediatric dentist. The water in the greater Vancouver area is not fluoridated, and only a few communities in British Columbia have fluoridated drinking water. The recommendation for the use of fluoride supplements should only be made following a thorough exam by your dentist.

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How safe are dental X-rays?

With contemporary safeguards, such as lead aprons and high-speed film, the amount of radiation received in a dental X-ray examination is extremely small. Even though there is very little risk, pediatric dentists are particularly careful to minimize the exposure of child patients to radiation. In fact, dental X-rays represent a far smaller risk than an undetected and untreated dental problem.

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My child plays sports. How should I protect my child's teeth?

Pediatric Dentistry is devoted to children and teaching them about good dental health. We provide basic and specialty oral care services including fillings, sealants, space maintenance & stainless steel crowns to children in a compassionate, child-friendly entertaining environment. Enjoy watching cartoons during the procedure !! Moreover, general anaesthesia is offered for children who are uncooperative.

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How can I help my child through the teething stage?

Sore gums when teeth erupt are part of the normal eruption process. The discomfort is eased for some children by use of a frozen teething ring. Your pharmacy should also have medications that can be rubbed on the gums to reduce the discomfort.

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If my child gets a cavity in a baby tooth, should it still be filled?

Primary, or "baby," teeth are important for many reasons. Not only do they help children speak clearly and chew naturally, they also aid in forming a path that permanent teeth can follow when they are ready to erupt. Some of them are necessary until a child is 12 years old or longer. In the event of a missing permanent tooth, the baby tooth may be maintained well into adulthood. Pain, infection of the gums and jaws, impairment of general health and premature loss of teeth are just a few of the problems that can happen when baby teeth are neglected. Also, because tooth decay is really an infection and will spread, decay on baby teeth can cause damage or decay on permanent teeth. Proper care of baby teeth is instrumental in enhancing the health of your child. In order to determine if a specific cavity needs to be filled, have your pediatric dentist examine the area.

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What causes tooth decay?

Four things are necessary for cavities to form -- a tooth, bacteria, sugars or other carbohydrates and time. Dental plaque is a thin, sticky, colorless deposit of bacteria that constantly forms on everyone's teeth. When you eat, the sugars in your food cause the bacteria in plaque to produce acids that attack the tooth enamel. With time and repeated acid attacks, the enamel breaks down and a cavity forms...

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